Utah Tech University

Branding Guide

The Utah Tech University brand goes far beyond our logos and colors; it is the very essence of who we are. Our brand represents our culture, mission, vision, values, and purpose to countless students, alumni, and stakeholders around the world. It is vital that we understand, live, strengthen, and promote our brand to expand our influence, reputation, and mission.

Our Institution

OVERVIEW

Established in 1911 and located in the heart of scenic St. George, Utah Tech University is a premier public university that offers certificates as well as associate, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees across all disciplines – humanities, arts, education, health sciences, business, and STEM. Utah Tech’s open, inclusive, comprehensive, polytechnic mission prepares students to graduate career-ready by offering hands-on learning experiences in each of its 250+ academic programs. As an open-access, teaching institution, Utah Tech offers a personalized learning experience to all students at the most affordable university tuition rate in the state of Utah. Additionally, more than 90% of students are offered scholarships, grants, or other financial aid. With 15 NCAA Division I athletic teams, 80+ active clubs, an average class size of 23, and an unbeatable student life, UT prepares students for successful careers and enriched lives.

The Utah Tech University Trailblazers identity pays homage to the institution’s pioneer founders and the grit and determination they demonstrated. UT continues to carry on their tradition of commitment to education. A bison represents the University since bison were the nation’s original trailblazers, creating the paths that eventually became the country’s railways and roads. Utah Tech’s mascot, Brooks the Bison, is named after Samuel Brooks, who was the first student to enroll after the institution’s founding.

VISION

Utah Tech University aspires to be a premier open, inclusive, comprehensive, polytechnic university distinguished through an ethos of innovation and entrepreneurship and the achievement of exceptional student learning and success.

MISSION

Utah Tech University is an open, inclusive, comprehensive, polytechnic university featuring active and applied learning to advance students’ knowledge and skills while fostering competent, resilient, lifelong learners to succeed in their careers and personal lives as creators, innovators, and responsible citizens.

VALUES

ACADEMIC DISTINCTION
Excellence as an open, inclusive, comprehensive, polytechnic university that distinguishes UT from other universities

STUDENT LEARNING AND SUCCESS
Achievement of learning outcomes and the attainment of an academic award or other educational goal, including holistic personal development

EQUITY AND INCLUSION
A safe, tolerant, and welcoming community with diverse identities, ideas, and beliefs who collaborate and learn through open and civil discourse

PURPOSEFUL DISCOVERY
Creative thinking and acting across boundaries to solve complex problems both individually and collaboratively

COLLABORATIVE CULTURE
An open culture grounded on principles of honesty, integrity, sharing, transparency, accountability, mutual respect, and freedom of inquiry

PUBLIC SERVICE
Effective leadership of civic, educational, economic, and cultural entities and initiatives to transform communities

LOCAL AND GLOBAL RESOURCES
Mutually beneficial partnerships that engage and integrate local and global resources into learning experiences with a special emphasis on Southern Utah

INNOVATION AND RESPONSIVENESS
Responsive to local and regional needs and opportunities through institutional innovation and entrepreneurship

HISTORY

Utah Tech University’s history goes all the way back to the settlement of St. George in 1861, when leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints asked 300+ families to move to the southwest corner of Utah to grow cotton, sugar cane, and olives. The encampment mall where these pioneers parked their covered wagons, raised their families, and taught their children school lessons is now the center of Utah Tech’s campus.

When the community was ready for a more formal college in 1909, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints began construction on the institution, then called St. George Stake Academy. A true community effort, Washington County residents funded $35,000 of the $55,000 project that was built on the corner of Main Street and 100 South. When the academy was ready to open in September 1911, Samuel Brooks was eager to earn an education and waited on the front steps beginning at 4 a.m. the day that registration opened so he could be the first student to enroll. A trailblazer in his own right, Samuel Brooks is who Utah Tech’s mascot, Brooks the Bison, got his name from.

During the Great Depression when the church withdrew its support of the college, the community acted as trailblazers again, covering the operational costs for two years until the state was prepared to assume ownership. The institution survived this period of transition thanks to the generous help of the community and their passion for education.

In the late 1940s, when the institution desperately needed campus housing due to the influx of students after World War II and the lack of state funding since the 1930s, the residents of Washington County stepped in again and formed the Dixie Education Association. Together they purchased property and built  the Women’s Residence Hall, commonly referred to as Dixiana. College employees even donated their time and efforts to help with the construction. The community pulled together to assist the college at a time when the state planned on returning the school to the LDS church.

The communities dedication paid off when the Dixie Education Association donated the land for a new campus (now known as the Dixie Campus) in 1955 and the institution was able to expand and grow. The decision to move campus was caused by the critically dangerous nature of the original gymnasium built in 1916 which was structurally unsafe and the desire to grow. The community raised money to purchase the six city blocks where pioneers first settled St. George in 1861. By the fall of 1963, the institution officially moved to its new home.

In the late 1990s, Washington County residents again appealed to the Utah Legislature, this time to petition for the addition of baccalaureate degrees to the college’s associate programs. Thanks to excellent leadership and tireless community effort, the college was granted approval to award bachelor’s degrees in business administration and computer science in 2000.

The college continued to add baccalaureate programs and just two years after celebrating its centennial gained university status in 2013. Made possible with the dedication and support of the community, university status means expanded opportunities for the storied institution. The University continues to grow and adapted a polytechnic approach to education starting in 2016 and master’s degrees in 2018.

As the University started recruiting students, faculty, and staff from the entire nation, competing in athletics against schools all across the country, being recognized at nationwide conferences, and receiving national awards, the University name was changed to Utah Tech University in 2022 to align the institutional name with the mission of being an open, inclusive, comprehensive polytechnic university.

Today, Utah Tech University’s more than 250 academic programs offer transformative experiences across all disciplines – humanities, arts, education, health sciences, business, and STEM. UT students learn by doing, take advantage of real-world learning through industry partnerships, and graduate career ready.

HISTORY OF THE INSTITUTION’S NAME

Utah Tech University came by its name through many changes. When the school first opened in 1911, it was called St. George Stake Academy. Although not an official name, the institution was known as Dixie Academy by locals. The word Dixie honored the community’s founders who came to grow cotton, indigo, and olives. Many of the original families who settled Washington City in 1857 were originally from southern states and had experience growing cotton crops. These pioneers were the first to call Washington County, Dixie, perhaps out of habit, but also due to the region’s isolation from the rest of the state, the fact that cotton was being grown, and the temperate climate that is comparable to that of the South. Even though cotton production halted in 1870, the nickname endured.

Two years of teacher preparation college courses were offered in fall of 1916. As a result of these changes, the school’s name was changed to Dixie Normal College in May 1918. Normal was used to indicate a teacher preparation program.

In 1923, the college’s board was reorganized and the word Normal was removed from the college name with the new name Dixie College being adopted. That name was retained until 1933, when the name was changed to Dixie Junior College as the school was transferred from the LDS Church to the State of Utah. The school name changed back to Dixie College in 1971.

The next major development occurred in 2000. Following a long effort by a committee of local residents, the Utah State Legislature authorized the institution to become a four-year state college with the name Dixie State College of Utah. Four-year bachelor’s degrees were offered in addition to associate degrees . The institution continued its role as a community college while adding a focus on four-year programs in many fields. Much of this expansion was linked to the growth of the county that was ten times its population in 1965.

In 2013, the Utah State Legislature expanded the role of the institution to become a university and open the door for more robust learning opportunities and graduate degrees to be offered. As a result, the name was changed to Dixie State University to reflect the institution’s university status.

After hearing an increasing number of first-hand accounts from recent graduates of how the institution’s name was affecting them and their career and grad school goals, the institution started researching the impacts of the Dixie name beginning in July 2020. A third-party impact study that elicited 3,700 responses found the name was having negative impacts on alumni and the University’s ability to recruit students, faculty, and staff. With this information, the institution underwent a comprehensive, two-year-long name recommendation process, which resulted in the University being renamed Utah Tech University starting July 1, 2022.

OUR VOICE

OVERVIEW

Utah Tech University communicates with countless audiences around the world, and providing a genuine and consistent voice is key to sharing our University’s story. Please apply the following messages and standards when communicating on behalf of Utah Tech. By crafting messaging designed to complement our mission, your audience will better understand what it means to be a Utah Tech Trailblazer.

TAGLINE

Our tagline promotes UT’s most important brand promises, makes the brand more memorable, and demonstrates the personality of the brand. Our tagline of “active learning. active life.” represents our hands-on, individualized learning experience that provides an enriched and active life both in and out of the classroom.

The institutional tagline is the only tagline permitted for use in marketing materials of any kind. When writing “active learning. active life.” in text format, use quotation marks around the entire tagline and periods at the end of each phrase. Use #activelearningactivelife in social media posts.

Example: We encourage you to come to Utah Tech and take advantage of the institution’s unique “active learning. active life.” experience.

active learning. active life.
POSITIONING STATEMENT

Our positioning statement offers a succinct and compelling overview of our institution and lets stakeholders know what they will experience when they interact with our brand. The entire positioning statement, portions of it, or general ideas from it can be used in written and verbal communications.

Utah Tech University is a premier open, inclusive, comprehensive, polytechnic institution that offers transformative experiences within all of our 250+ programs and disciplines
– humanities, arts, education, health sciences, business, and STEM – with the most affordable university tuition in Utah. Our students make, create, and innovate in the classroom and online while gaining real-world active learning experiences through internships, clinical experiences, undergraduate research, industry partnerships,
and service-learning.

As a teaching institution, we meet students where they are, provide personalized learning, and create a caring, supportive community for anyone with a desire to improve their future through education. Students graduate prepared for rewarding careers and enriched lives with the technical, critical thinking, and collaborative skills needed to excel in our ever-changing global economy.

UT'S POLYTECHNIC MISSION

There are important differences between a technical college and polytechnic university; each providing critical services for our community and workforce needs. Largely, technical colleges offer skill-specific programs and certificates for a particular career or trade that can often be completed in less than a year. Polytechnic universities also focus on applied and hands-on learning, but offer general education degrees along with more in-depth associate, bachelor, and graduate degrees.

In short, our polytechnic education is hands-on learning and career readiness.

A Utah Tech University education means active learning with an emphasis on technology within all our academic disciplines. Our human-centered approach to problem-solving prepares students for successful careers and meaningful lives. Students experience applied learning and authentic industry experiences that cater to diverse abilities.

KEY MARKETING MESSAGES

Key marketing messages simply and authentically tell our audiences who we are and what we offer. When crafting content, be sure to include at least one key message whether visually or written. When determining which key messages to include, carefully consider the audience(s) you are trying to reach, then select key messages that will best resonate with them.

VALUE
Utah Tech University offers a quality education with more than 250 academic programs at the most affordable university tuition cost in Utah.

active learning. active life.
Utah Tech University provides personalized and hands-on learning experiences that prepare students for meaningful lives.

OPEN & INCLUSIVE
Utah Tech University is an open-access institution that promotes inclusivity through personalized services, diverse teaching methods, and access to open educational resources.

INNOVATION
Utah Tech University embraces a human-centered approach to problem-solving through innovation, technology, and collaboration while incorporating cutting-edge learning practices across all disciplines.

COMMUNITY & INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS
Utah Tech University is closely connected to its community and focuses on shaping students through industry partnerships and experiential, civic, and service-learning.

DESTINATION
Utah Tech University offers unparalleled opportunities for an active lifestyle in a world-renowned community surrounded by striking landscapes and national parks.

CAREER READY
Utah Tech University prepares students for rewarding careers through personalized and engaged learning opportunities such as internships, clinical experiences, co-ops, program advisory boards, industry partnerships, and workforce pipelines.

TRADITION
UtahTechUniversity is built upon a rich pioneering heritage and provides the complete college experience through student life opportunities, Division I athletics, and cultural events.

KEY AUDIENCES

Each audience we communicate with has unique perspectives and needs from the University. Be sure to consider these when determining which key messages to employ when communicating with a specific audience. Below are examples of matching key marketing messages to specific audiences.

PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
Value, “active learning. active life.”, Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Destination, Career Ready

CURRENT STUDENTS
Value, ““active learning. active life.”, Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Career Ready

PARENTS
Value, “active learning. active life.”, Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Community & Industry Partnerships, Career Ready

COMMUNITY MEMBERS
Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Community & Industry Partnerships, Tradition

ALUMNI
Community & Industry Partnerships, Tradition

LEGISLATORS, & PARTNERS
Value, “active learning. active life.”, Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Community & Industry Partnerships, Career Ready, Tradition

FACULTY & STAFF
Open & Inclusive, Innovation, Community & Industry Partnerships, Tradition

INSTITUTIONAL NAME & ACRONYM

When referring to the institution in an official capacity either printed or verbal, the full institutional name of Utah Tech University should be used whenever possible and always as the first reference.

Utah Tech is to be used whenever a shortened version or secondary reference is needed (not Utech, Tech, etc.).

UT is the approved institutional acronym and can be used whenever a shortened version or tertiary reference is needed (not UTU, etc.). For various branding and trademark reasons, it is crucial to only use UT as the institutional acronym. UT not only represents our name and the state of Utah, but helps differentiate us from other acronyms in the state: UVU, USU, SUU, the U, etc. When writing UT, periods should not be included in the acronym.

Name Hierarchy:

Utah Tech University
Utah Tech
UT

HASHTAGS

Utah Tech University uses the following hashtags in social media posts:

#activelearningactivelife
#utahtechuniversity
#utahtech
#stompem
#utahtechblazers

Be sure to select the appropriate hashtag for the specific content you are posting. If relevant, it is acceptable to use more than one hashtag, in a single post.

Our Look

OVERVIEW

Utah Tech University’s typefaces, colors, and logos are carefully designed to powerfully represent our brand in a visual way. When used correctly, the University’s primary identifiers deliver a consistent and clear visual message. Please follow the standards closely and precisely when creating branded content.

TYPEFACES

The fonts below are approved for Utah Tech branded materials. Utah Tech’s fonts were chosen to showcase our brand and create uniformity across all mediums. Download Utah Tech approved fonts.

HEADER OPTIONS

Utah Tech  

The Utah Tech typeface was designed exclusively for Utah Tech University. This typeface is only available in all caps and is only used for headings. Stacking two lines of text in the Utah Tech typeface is discouraged; rather, use Altivo when multiple levels of content are needed.

Utah Tech Font

Bison
Bison is our display typeface and is typically used in headings and facility branding due to its tall and thin design, which allows for maximum size and legibility. This typeface should not be used in body copy.

BISON Font Typeface

BODY COPY OPTIONS

Altivo
Altivo is a sans serif typeface— a style of type that does not have serifs, the projections finishing off a stroke of a letter — and can be used for headings and body copy. Altivo offers 16 various styles in eight weights.

ALTIVO FONT

 

Loretta
Loretta is a serif typeface and provides an alternative style for body copy. Loretta should only be used in text-heavy publications like magazines or scholarly articles, not marketing materials like postcards or brochures.

LORETTA FONT

COLORS

Utah Tech University has a primary color palette of red and blue, representing the red rocks and blue skies of Southern Utah. The Utah Tech identity utilizes red and blue in tandem, not separately. The use of the two colors helps differentiate the Utah Tech brand from other institutions in the state and region. Whenever a two-color option is available for printed materials, merchandise, uniforms, etc., both colors must be used.

Primary

Utah Tech’s primary colors should be used as the most dominant colors in all mediums.

Utah Tech Colors
Rock Red
C: 12%
M: 100%
Y: 100 %
K: 15%

PMS: 200
HEX: BA1C21

Brooks Blue
C: 100%
M: 58%
Y: 9%
K: 60%

PMS: 540
HEX: 003058

Secondary

The secondary color allows for more variation and should complement the primary colors.

White
C: 0
M: 0
Y: 0
K: 0

PMS: 000
HEX: FFFFFF

Accent
The accent color should be used sparingly.

Trailblazer Grey
C: 24
M: 17
Y: 17
K: 0

PMS: 428
HEX: C2c5c7

Other Printable Colors

All Utah Tech creative assets may be printed in black or white.

Black
C: 75
M: 68
Y: 67
K: 89

PMS: Black
HEX: 000000

White
C: 0
M: 0
Y: 0
K: 0

PMS: 000
HEX: FFFFFF

LOGOS

The Utah Tech University logos serve as the most recognizable identifiers for our institution. All print and digital communications should include an approved university logo and strictly follow the standards outlined below. To maintain the integrity of UT’s identity, the logo
must be consistently applied in all usages. To provide flexibility and accommodate for a variety of design needs and spaces, any of the institutional logos, wordmarks, logomarks, or nameplates are acceptable to use. Any adaptations to these standards must be approved by University Marketing & Communication through our artwork approval form. 

Download all institutional logos.

Utah Tech University Logo Explained

INSTITUTIONAL LOGOS

Institutional logos that include “university” should be used whenever possible. It is preferred that marketing materials leaving Washington County use the institutional logos that include “St. George, Utah.”

Primary Institutional Logo

Utah Tech University Primary Logo

Secondary Institutional Logo

(A)

Secondary Logo Utah Tech University

(B)

Secondary Logo Utah Tech University

 

Institutional Wordmark

Utah Tech University Wordmark

Institutional Nameplate

 

Utah Tech University Nameplate

 

Institutional Logomark

 

Utah Tech University Logomark

 

Institutional Tagline

Utah Tech University Tagline

Institutional Wordmark with Tagline

Utah Tech University Wordmark with Tagline

 

Institutional Logomark with Tagline

 

Utah Tech University Logomark with Tagline

Utah Tech University Wordmark

Utah Tech University Logomark with Tagline

LOGO USAGE

Utah Tech logos may be used on any institutional materials; however, each logo has specific guidelines outlined in this section. All logos must remain in their original format and cannot be manipulated in any way. Official UT logos are the only logos approved to represent Utah Tech University. Other logos, including depictions of bison other than the Brooks Spirit Mark, the bison in the Trailblazer Medallion, and the Brooks Caricature, are not allowed. The bison in the Trailblazer Medallion can be removed and used for merchandising/bookstore collateral only, but must be accompanied by our institutional name.

Safe Spacing

Careful consideration must be used when placing logos close to other graphic elements or text. Please refer to the measurements on this page for the minimum amount of clear space required around the logo to protect its integrity. Allowing even more space is recommended. This ensures that other graphic elements or text do not appear to be connected with the logo, distract from the logo, or disrupt its visibility.

Safe Spacing Utah Tech Logo

Correct Usage

Allow for safe spacing around the logo so the logo does not distract from the focal point of the photo as well as safe spacing along the edge of the frame of the photo.

Incorrect Usage

Do not reduce opacity

Do not stretch, skew, or warp

Do not use any sort of drop shadow

Do not apply patterns or filters

Do not use unapproved colors

Do not separate or remove elements of the logo

Do not add any elements to the logo

Do not use low-contrast or busy backgrounds

The UT Campus Store and Team Shops have the right to make selective changes to institutional logos to accommodate merchandising trends.

COLLEGE & DEPARTMENT LOGOS

College and department logos represent individual campus entities as well as Utah Tech University as a whole. Including our logo in all institutional entities’ logos strengthen the UT brand by increasing the University’s exposure to a variety of audiences. Additionally, the department and college’s brand is strengthened by connecting it to the Utah Tech University brand. College and department logos exist to distinguish the college and department from similar entities at other universities rather than from different entities at Utah Tech.

All academic colleges and departments must use a version of the institutional logo in their logos. Nonacademic institutional departments have the option of using the institutional or spirit mark in their department logos upon specific approval from University Marketing & Communication. Utah Tech entities are not allowed to create their own logos; only UMAC can create official logos and will do so for any UT entity free of charge.

Request a department logo.

Colleges

Utah Tech College of Business LogoUtah Tech College of Business Logo

Utah Tech College of Business LogoUtah Tech College of Business Logo

Academic Departments

Utah Tech Applied SociologyUtah Tech Applied Sociology
Utah Tech Applied SociologyUtah Tech Applied Sociology

Nonacademic Departments

ATHLETIC LOGOS & SPIRIT MARKS

Utah Tech’s athletic logos and spirit marks represent our athletic nickname, the Trailblazers, and our mascot, Brooks the Bison. These identities help build school spirit, create camaraderie, and provide additional and engaging ways to promote Utah Tech University.

The athletic logos are reserved for Utah Tech Division I athletic teams, club sports, and athletic staffs. Athletics can also utilize spirit marks for marketing and branding purposes but should do so in a secondary capacity. For example, the athletic UT should be used for any primary, forward facing branding opportunities such as television spots, social media accounts, score tickers, etc. The spirit marks can be used in secondary, complementary locations such as uniforms, facilities, and merchandising once the primary logo has been established.

UT Athletics is a major part of our overall brand and frequently appears on media outlets across the nation, and all uniforms must be approved through the Athletic Department and University and Marketing & Communication. To honor agreements made with other universities, Utah Tech Athletics should utilize both red and blue whenever possible, and the athletic wordmark cannot be in Brooks Blue as a single color.

Primary

Utah Tech Trailblazers Athletic Primary Logo

Secondary

Utah Tech Secondary Athletic Logo

Primary Wordmark

Primary Wordmark

Secondary Wordmark

Secondary Wordmark

Primary Logomark
Primary Logomark

Primary Spirit Mark
Primary Spirit Mark

 

 

Brooks Spirit Mark

The Brooks Spirit Mark is centered on the left edge of the horn.

Brooks Spirit Mark

 

 

Utah Tech Spirit Mark

Utah Tech Spirit Mark

 

 

Trailblazer Spirit Mark

Trailblazer Spirit Mark

SEALS & MEDALLIONS

Presidential Seal
Utah Tech University Presidential Seal
The Presidential Seal is reserved for official University use such as diplomas, certificates of graduation, and official university reports and policies as well as at the University president’s discretion. In addition, the Presidential Seal may be used for permanent structures, awards, and special projects.

University Seal
Utah Tech University Seal
The University Seal serves as an alternative to the Presidential Seal and is customizable to individual departments. The University Seal may be used on print materials, awards, and official documents representing departments, colleges, or divisions; however, marketing materials should use official institutional or department logos. This seal is not designed to take the place of the official department logos but to provide a more formal alternative when appropriate. Request a University Seal customized to your department

Trailblazer Medallion
Trailblazer Medallion Utah Tech University
The Trailblazer Medallion may be used for merchandising, events, awards, and promotional materials. The medallion should not be used for official documents or in place of institutional or athletic logos. The bison and red hills can be removed and used separately or together for merchandising purposes only, but not as official logos for University entities.

Athletic Seal
Utah Tech University Athletic Seal
The Athletic Seal is customizable to individual athletic teams and may be used for awards and official documents representing athletics; however, uniforms, clothing, marketing materials, and social media channels should use official athletic logos. This seal is not designed to take place of the athletic logos but to provide a more formal alternative when appropriate.

STUDENT LEADERSHIP LOGOS

Student Leadership Logos may be used to represent student leadership organizations in all materials. The following organizations have access to Student Leadership Logos:

  • Utah Tech Student Association
  • Alumni Ambassadors
  • Ambassadors
  • Multicultural & Inclusion Student Association
  • Housing Resident Assistants & Resident Managers
  • Peer Coach Program
  • Student Activities Council

Student Leadership Logos

STUDENT CLUBS & ORGANIZATION LOGOS

Any institutionally sponsored student organization can receive a templated logo including an institutional logo and/or spirit mark and their organization’s name. Additionally, teams sponsored by Campus Recreation are allowed to use a templated athletic logo with their team’s name.

UTSA Clubs are allowed to create their own logos; however, clubs that don’t use the approved templates cannot use the institutional names and/or logos in their branding.

Request a logo

Student Clubs and Organization Logos

BROOKS SEAL & CARICATURE

University entities with a community or youth audience may use the Brooks Seal or Caricature with UMAC approval. The caricature may be customized by UMAC to reflect the entity’s purpose and mission.

Brooks Seal 
Brooks Seal Utah Tech University MascotBrooks Seal Utah Tech University Mascot

Brooks Caricature
Brooks Caricature Utah Tech University MascotBrooks Caricature Utah Tech University Mascot

BISON HAND SIGNAL

The official hand signal of Utah Tech University is a bison head and horns as illustrated below. This should be the only hand signal used at athletic games, pictures, and other casual events to represent Trailblazers. The illustration below can be used in Rock Red, Brooks Blue, black, or white as a visual representation of the Bison Hand Signal on all materials.

Use #stompem in social media posts.

Utah Tech University Bison Hand Signal

Our Facilities

OVERVIEW

A clear and consistent campus aesthetic is a vital part of our identity. Purposeful facility branding enhances our brand and creates excitement, pride, and consistency in addition to saving the institution time and resources.

View the full Facility Branding Guide

SIGNAGE

Consistent signage helps the public identify, locate, and move around campus efficiently and strengthens the UT brand. All signage sizing should follow campus standards.
Request Signage

MONUMENT SIGNS

Large outdoor wayfinding signs on the perimeter of university property that name the entire institution and specific branch locations

BUILDING SIGNS

Outdoor wayfinding signs for the entire building that are typically the only signage mounted on the outside of Utah Tech facilities

DEPARTMENT SIGNS

Outdoor wayfinding signs for specific departments and offices (Most campus entities will not have their own department signs.)

BUILDING DIRECTORY SIGNS

Indoor wayfinding signs that identify the entities found within each building

LOBBY SIGNS

Indoor wayfinding signs typically found in office lobbies that identify the specific department or office

OFFICE DOOR SIGNS

Indoor wayfinding signs that identify specific rooms and campus employees

FACILITY FINISHES

University buildings are designed in accordance with institutional branding standards. In order to maintain the quality aesthetic of each building, it is imperative that building standards continue to be followed once buildings are complete. The following guidelines are designed to keep Utah Tech facility finishes consistent across campus.

Walls
Paint and wall coverings must be approved in advance and coordinated with Facilities Management.

Decorations
No personal decorations are allowed in any public-facing areas. No plants are allowed in lobbies or public spaces unless relevant to an academic purpose, such as biology, or approved by Facilities Management with an arrangement for care.

Window Coverings
Roller shades are the standard window coverings in all buildings, and specific shades must be approved by Facilities Management. No curtains are allowed.

Frosted Vinyl
Frosted vinyl is only allowed under circumstances where confidentiality is imperative, such as student counseling, medical services, etc. Vinyl on windows must be approved by the Space Committee and installed with UMAC coordination.

Lighting & Furniture
All lighting, furniture, and wood finishes are based on specific building standards and must be approved by Facilities Management.

Garbage Cans
Garbage cans should be requested from Facilities Management.

Whiteboards
Whiteboards must be approved by UMAC and will include frosted glass magnetic boards that are mounted to the wall by offset aluminum barrel mounts.

Facility Artwork & Media
Utah Tech University artwork and other visuals should be representative of the values and tenets of the institution. There are specific standards for lobby art based on each building. To order lobby art, set up a consultation with UMAC.

CAMPUS BRANDING & ADVERTISING

Advertising:
Designated bulletin boards and banners can be used for student and university promotions. Outside entities can utilize the community bulletin board in front of the McDonald Center. All promotional signs must be approved and stamped by the Vice President of Student Affairs office and can be up for no more than three weeks.  Hanging any advertising in nondesignated areas is prohibited. Any advertising designed to be placed on the ground must be printed on vinyl made for such applications.

 

Pull-Up Banners:
Pull-up banners are not to be used on campus for ongoing information. They are only allowed for specific events with a temporary timeframe.

 

Permanent Branding:
All permanent banners, billboards, vehicle wraps, and wall and window vinyl must be approved through UMAC. Any branding in University common areas must be current institutional branding.

 

A-Frames:
A-frames displayed on campus must have a professional-looking design and be in approved brand colors. If A-frames are used for more than three days, signs should be printed on waterproof material such as corrugated plastic like Correx. A-frame messages can be up for three weeks prior to the event and must be removed immediately following the event. A-frame signage must be mounted to the physical frame in such a way that no tape is showing.

 

Personal Offices:
Anything hung on the wall in a personal office must be hung by Facilities Management and meet the standards of the Facility Branding Guide. If your office window faces a public facing area, refrain from stacking anything in the window. Keep a clean, open aesthetic. Personal photos and belongings are approved but framed pictures and other items should not be affixed to permanent structures; rather, use easels or self-standing frames. Employee diplomas can be hung with the assistance of Facilities Management.

 

For additional information about approved branding or facility finishes in any campus space, please work with Facilities Management and University Marketing & Communication. In addition to Facilities Management and UMAC approval, any changes or additions to facility branding must receive final approval from the Utah Tech University Space Committee.

Our Resources

OVERVIEW

Utah Tech University’s brand is multifaceted and includes a wide variety of messaging and visual components. To help campus communicators accurately and effectively share the Utah Tech brand with the world, University Marketing & Communication has numerous branding resources and services available to the University community.

UMAC’s full array of resources

WORD USAGE GUIDE

Writing Style

Utah Tech University is authentically represented when we use one consistent writing style in all messaging. To achieve this, the University turns to The Associated Press Stylebook as our official editorial style manual and Webster’s New World College Dictionary as our preferred dictionary. The Word Usage Guide below is a list of the correct way to apply terms and conventions frequently used when writing about the University.

Word Usage Guide

academic degrees: Generic degree terms such as associate degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or doctorate are not capitalized: He has a bachelor’s degree in biology. (Note that it is associate degree, not possessive.) However, capitalize the formal name of degrees: Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Avoid abbreviations such as B.A., M.A., Ph.D. when possible. When abbreviations are necessary, include periods.

academic departments: When writing about a UT academic department, capitalize the department name: She is a professor in the Biological Sciences Department. However, when not using the formal department name, do not capitalize: She is studying biology.

acronyms: Acronyms should be in capital letters with no periods. With the exception of well-understood acronyms and abbreviations, such as GPA and USA, spell out the full name on first use. Do not follow the spelled-out reference with the acronym in parentheses.

advisor: Not adviser.

addresses: Only use the abbreviations Ave., Blvd., and St. with an address: 225 S. University Ave. Spell out and capitalize avenue, boulevard, and street when they are part of a formal street name without a number: UT is located on University Avenue. Don’t abbreviate similar words such as drive, alley, and road. For the grid system, abbreviate the first direction: 100 S. 100 East.

alumna, alumnae, alumnus, alumni: Alumna is the feminine singular form. Alumnae is the feminine plural. Alumnus is the male (or nonspecific gender) singular. Alumni is the masculine or mixed-gender plural.

Alumni Ambassadors: A student group that upholds traditions, hosts events, and fosters lasting relationships between students and alumni.

Brooks: The name of UT’s athletic mascot. Brooks the Bison was introduced to the community on April 11, 2016, when the University unveiled its new Trailblazers athletic identity, and the mascot costume was unveiled at the first home football game of the 2016 season. Brooks is named after Samuel Brooks, the first student to enroll in the institution — then known as St. George Stake Academy — in 1911. Samuel Brooks slept on the steps of the academy the night before enrollment opened to pay the $10 tuition because he was so excited to attend.

catalog: Not catalogue.

chair: Use the nonsexist terms chair or chairperson, depending on the preference of the individual. AP prefers chairman or chairwoman, but don’t use those unless they are part of an official title.

contractions: Although contractions may be discouraged in formal academic writing, they are acceptable in most instances for University news, marketing pieces and websites.

coursework: One word.

credits: This is the accepted term at Utah Tech. Don’t use credit hours or hours.

dates: Always use numerals without st, nd, rd or th on the end: President Williams’ birthday is March 14, 1971. When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate only Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec. Spell out the month when using a month without a date. The spring semester will begin in January 2017. If the month, date and year are all included, set the year off with commas: Classes started on Aug. 22, 2016, and the students rejoiced. The year is not necessary when referring to something within the current calendar year. When referring to a date that is within the next week, just use the day of the week; when it is further out than that, just use the date: The club will meet on Wednesday and then again on Sept. 21.

“D” on the Hill: The white “D” on the Hill, located west of Bluff Street, is owned by Utah Tech. The “D” was officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service on May 25, 2022. Annually during D-Week, students, alumni, and community members hike up to the “D” on the Hill to whitewash it.

D-Week: A spirit week full of traditional events similar to Homecoming Week, but held during the spring semester. During D-Week, the “D” on the Hill is lit up red. Because it honors the traditions and history of the University and community, D-Week retained its name after the institution rebranded to Utah Tech University as a nod to the Dixie community’s longstanding support of the University.

Digital ID: Student/faculty/staff ID number.

Dixie Campus: When the Utah State Legislature approved the Utah Tech University name, they also approved the main campus being known as the Dixie Campus in recognition of Washington County being known as Utah’s Dixie. In 1861, leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints called 309 families to create The
Dixie Mission in St. George and grow cotton. The nickname persists because of the region’s isolation from the rest of the state and its temperate climate that is comparable to that of the southern region of the U.S. The Encampment Mall on campus is where pioneers settled when they first came to St. George.

grades: Use the capital letters, A, B, C, etc., with no quotation marks. Plurals are made by adding s, except in the case of A, which has an apostrophe to avoid confusion with the word as: A’s, Bs, Cs, etc.

GPA: Acceptable in all references for grade-point average.

international students: Not foreign-exchange students.

Multicultural Inclusion Student Association: Student-leaders, who are housed in the Center for Inclusion & Belonging, lead activities and education campaigns across campus to foster a sense of belonging for everyone.

MyUT: Student portal where students can access their personal information, student services, and financial aid.

name: The name of the University officially changed to Utah Tech University on July 1, 2022. The name changed from Dixie State University after the institution started researching the impacts of the Dixie name and conducted a comprehensive, two-year-long name recommendation process. The history of the institution’s name is as follows:
1911-1913 — St. George Stake Academy
1913-1916 — Dixie Academy
1916-1923 — Dixie Normal College
1923-1971 — Dixie Junior College
1971-2000 — Dixie College
2000-2013 — Dixie State College of Utah
2013-2022— Dixie State University
2022- present — Utah Tech University
When writing about the institution in the past, denote that the institution was called that at the time: She earned an associate degree from Dixie Junior College, as the institution was called at the time.

non: Words with the prefix non are generally not hyphenated unless the prefix is directly before a proper noun: nondegree, nonresident, noncredit, non-English speaking.

off campus, on campus: Hyphenate when using as an adjective, not as an adverb. Example:
Off-campus housing is plentiful during the summer.
It’s difficult to find housing off campus during the fall semester.

Opine: An email listserv that reaches faculty and staff who have opted in. This listserv is an opportunity for employees to share nonofficial business and have discussions. Anyone can send messages to the recipients on this list by sending emails to opine@utahtech.edu.

Palm Street: The pedestrian highway that is lined with palm trees and spans from the Holland Centennial Commons & Library to the Burns Arena.

pre and post: These prefixes generally don’t take hyphens unless they come directly before a proper noun: preregister, premedicine, postbaccalaureate, pre-Columbian.

President Richard “Biff” Williams: The 18th president of the University was named president on July 17, 2014. In formal University publications, refer to him as President Richard B. Williams on first reference and President Williams on second reference. For more casual communications, refer to him as President Richard “Biff” Williams on first reference and Williams on second reference.

range of time, day or date: The preferred form in body copy is to use words such as “to” and “through” instead of using a dash when referring to a range of time or days of the week. Example: The seminar is scheduled to take place from April 1 to 3. Office hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. In nonsentence form, such as a listing, dashes are acceptable.

résumé: The preferred spelling includes the diacritical marks and helps avoid confusion with resume.

semesters: Lowercase the semester name when referring to a general time of study, but capitalize it when referring to a specific semester: He is taking 15 credits in the spring semester. The Fall 2016 Semester began on Aug. 22.

Southern Utah: Capitalize Southern because it is the proper name of a region.

Stampede, The: The student section at athletic events. The Stampede is its own branch within the UT Student Association.
state names: Spell out the names of states when used alone in text or after the name of a city or county. Do not include the state name when referring to a city of town in Utah. Use the postal service abbreviation and zip code in a complete address. (AP recently has changed to follow this style.)

Student Ambassadors: Utah Tech University Student Ambassadors give campus tours, host overnight visits for high school seniors, and share their experiences as UT students with prospective students across the country.

student housing: This is preferred to dorm or dormitory when referring to on-campus housing.

theater, theatre: UT’s Theatre Department is spelled the British way, so when referring to the program use the British spelling, but when not referring to the official department, go with the American spelling: UT’s Theatre Department puts on great theater productions.

times: Punctuate times as follows: 7 a.m. or 8:30 p.m.

toward: Not towards.

Trail Tracker: A weekly e-newsletter that is emailed to the entire student body through Student Affairs to inform students of campus events and provide them with important information. To contact the Trail Tracker team, email trailtracker@utahtech.edu or call 652-7514.

Trailblazer Art in the City: A partnership between UT and the City of St. George that places hand-painted bison statues around the city and at local businesses. The project promotes Utah Tech University, local businesses, and the arts while beautifying the city and creating a greater university town environment. Learn more about the Trailblazer Art in the City.

University: In official UT publications, capitalize University when it stands alone and is referring to Utah Tech University, but lowercase it when referring to institutions of higher education in general.

UT Announce: An email listserv that is managed by University Marketing & Communication and reaches all faculty and staff. Employees cannot opt out, so emails must be approved and relate to official University business or events. Emails requesting to be distributed on UT Announce should be sent to utannounce@utahtech.edu.

Utah Tech Student Association (UTSA): UT’s student government is funded by student fees, led by the student body president, and composed of six branches: Academics, Clubs & Organizations, Marketing, Service, The Stampede, and Student Life.

Utah Tech University: Located in the heart of scenic St. George, Utah Tech University prepares students to graduate career-ready by offering countless hands-on learning experiences as part of the University’s “active learning. active life.” approach to education. As an open-access institution, Utah Tech offers a personalized learning experience to all students across all disciplines – humanities, arts, education, health sciences, business, and STEM – at the most affordable tuition rate in the state. With more than 250 academic programs, small class sizes, and an unbeatable student life, UT prepares students for successful careers and enriched lives.

Utah Tech University Foundation: A nonprofit 501(c)3 foundation that exists to support UT and education. Since its inception, the foundation has helped thousands of students by offering need-based scholarships. Funding for these scholarships comes through the annual Fire & Ice Gala, a formal event held in early spring that features silent and live auctions, dinner, and entertainment. The foundation has been formerly known as the Dixie Foundation and the Dixie College Foundation.

web addresses: Italicize web addresses in body copy. It isn’t necessary to include http:// or www. in a URL when it is clear that it’s a web address. Some sites do, however, require one or both elements of the URL, so test it first. When listing web addresses, try to get the URL to fit on a single line. If it is necessary to break the URL, try to break it before a slash or period. Don’t allow the URL to break itself by adding a hyphen because that could change the address. Use appropriate punctuation after a URL. If it finishes a sentence, place a period after it. Note: If a frequently used web address is long and cumbersome to include in printed copy, Web Services can create a shorter, user-friendly alternative link.

website: One word, lowercase.

-wide: There is no hyphen when using as a suffix: citywide, nationwide, Universitywide or industrywide.
work-study: Hyphenate; capitalize only when using the formal designation: Federal Work-Study Program.

 

Punctuation Usage Guide

Ampersands: Don’t use an ampersand in place of the word “and” in text unless it is an official part of a name: University Marketing & Communication.

Bulleted lists: When making a bulleted or numbered list, be sure that capitalization, punctuation and structure are consistent. If items in a list are complete sentences, end each one with appropriate punctuation.

Colons: Colons are used to indicate something is following that will complete or amplify the previous material. It isn’t necessary to capitalize the word immediately following a colon unless it begins a complete sentence of its own or is a proper noun. Don’t use unnecessary colons in sentences.
Correct: Visit the website at utahtech.edu.
Incorrect: Visit the website at: utahtech.edu.
Use a colon when the sentence isn’t complete without it. Visit the Utah Tech website: utahtech.edu.

comma: When writing a list of three or more items use the Oxford comma (the comma before the and). An exception to this is when writing press releases, where the Oxford comma is not used unless it is necessary to clarify the meaning in line with AP Style. If more than one series is used in a sentence, separate the series by semicolons if necessary to clarify the sentence.

Set off the name of a state with commas when it follows the city name in a sentence: St. George, Utah, is the home of Utah Tech University.
Commas set off the year in a complete date: May 3, 2013, marked Utah Tech’s first commencement ceremony as a university. There is no comma if only the month and year are used: Utah Tech’s first university commencement ceremony was in May 2013.

Dashes: The en dash (named because it is the width of the letter “n”) is wider than a hyphen and is used between ranges of dates: The 2016–17 academic year got off to a great start. There are no spaces before or after the en dash. In text, use the missing words instead of a dash: He was at Utah Tech from 1993 to 1998.

The em dash (named because it is the width of the letter “m”) is used to indicate a break in thought or a strong parenthetical phrase: Two professors — a first-year history professor and a tenured English professor — share the teaching duties. There are spaces before and after the em dash. An em dash is indicated by two hyphens in typed material or can be made on a Mac by entering option, shift and dash at the same time.

Exclamation points: Use them sparingly. Never use more than one exclamation point in a paragraph and very seldom use more than one in an article. Never end a single sentence with more than one exclamation point.

Hyphens: Use a hyphen when forming a compound modifier: Utah Tech University is an open-enrollment institution. Note: When an adjective ending in –ly is used, a hyphen is not necessary: Only one bag of groceries fits into the comically small trunk.

Parentheses: Avoid using parentheses when inserting a parenthetical statement into a sentence. Rather, use a set of em dashes: Utah Tech University — an open-enrollment institution — offers more than 250 academic programs.

Quotation marks: Quotation marks are placed outside of commas and periods, but inside of semicolons and colons. Question marks and exclamation marks are placed inside or outside the quotation marks, depending on whether they are part of the quote: Would it be fair to say, “Utah Tech University is the best university in the state”? The professor asked his student, “Did I hear you correctly?”

Avoid using quotation marks around a word because the word isn’t being used literally or to call attention to it or. Rather, choose stronger words that better convey the meaning of the sentence.
Put quotation marks around compositions such as books, computer games, movies, plays, operas, poems, album names, songs, lectures, speeches, works of art, and TV and radio program titles.

Capitalization Usage Guide

course titles: Capitalize course titles when used in text: She is taking Cultures in Conflict this semester.

departments, programs, offices: Capitalize the official names of University departments, programs and offices: Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, College of the Arts. She is studying in the Humanities Department. Lowercase when not using the official name: financial aid office, the college. She is studying humanities. Don’t capitalize a generic term that follows or precedes more than one name: the Arts and Health Sciences colleges. Don’t capitalize the words program, office, etc., if they are not part of the unit’s official name: University Marketing & Communication office. See the Offices and Departments listing for official names.

headlines, headings and subheads: For newspapers and websites, only capitalize the first word and proper nouns. For magazines, capitalize each word.

homecoming: Capitalize only when referring to UT’s Homecoming.

majors, minors: Lowercase: communication, business administration.

state: Don’t capitalize the word state: state of Utah. Use the same rule with city of St. George.

titles: Capitalize a title when it appears before the person’s name: Professor Fred Smith. Do not capitalize a title when it follows a person’s name: Fred Smith, professor of accounting. The exception to this rule is for a named chair or professorship that contains the academic title or for a faculty member who has earned a title such as Distinguished Professor: Jane Doe, Distinguished Professor of mathematics.

 

Number Usage Guide
Spell out numbers one through nine within text. Use numerals for higher numbers. Exceptions are made for ages, monetary units, percentages and GPAs, which are always numerals unless they start a sentence: 8 percent, 3.5 GPA, 3-year-old daughter, 7 cents. It’s acceptable to mix uses in a sentence: Utah Tech has 13 intercollegiate athletics programs: seven women’s and six men’s.

Spell out percent instead of using the % symbol: 18 percent

Plurals of numerals are made by adding the letter s: 100s, 1990s. There is no apostrophe in the plurals. Contractions of years take an apostrophe: Class of ’92. Make sure the apostrophe bends outward.

Numbers containing four digits or more (except years) take commas between each series of three numbers: 4,000, 12,297,865. For rounded numbers of more than six digits, it is appropriate to use a figure and a word: $14 million, 237 billion.

Use dollar signs and numerals for monetary references. It’s not necessary to add .00 after whole dollar amounts. If you are just discussing cents, use the word: 5 cents; 47 cents.

Telephone numbers are written with a hyphen between groupings for press releases: 435-652-7500. For University publications, use a period between groupings: 435.652.7500.

Spell out numbers at the start of a sentence unless they represent a year. Avoid starting sentences with numbers if possible. 1776 is the year the Declaration of Independence was signed is permissible, but it would be better to rewrite the sentence to avoid starting with the year: The Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776.

A series of years should be indicated by using the entire year in the first year and only the last two numbers in the second year: 2015-16. When the years cross a century mark, the entire year must be used: 1999-2002.

CAMPUS BUILDING NAME GUIDE

When referring to campus buildings on first reference, use the official name of the building listed below. For subsequent reference, the abbreviated version of the name, which is marked in parentheses below, is acceptable.

Abby Apartments
Atkin Administration Building North (North Admin)
Atkin Administration Building South (South Admin)
Atwood Innovation Plaza (Innovation Plaza)
Booth Wellness Center
Brooks’ Stop
Browning Learning Resource Center
Burns Arena
Burns North Offices (Burns Offices)
Campus View Suites I (Campus View I)
Campus View Suites II (Campus View II)
Chancellor Apartments
Clock Tower
College of Education Building
Cooper Field Building
Dolowitz/Snow Cabin (Cabin)
Eccles Fine Arts Center (Eccles)
Encampment Mall North
Encampment Mall South
Facilities Management
Gardner Student Center (Gardner)
Graff Fine Arts
Greater Zion Stadium
Habibian Athletics Center
Hangar
Heat Plant
Holland Centennial Commons & Library (Holland)
Human Performance Center (HPC)
Hurricane Education Center
Hurst Baseball Complex
Institute for Continued Learning (ICL)
IT Solutions Center
Jennings Communication Building (Jennings)
Kanab Education Center
M.K. Cox Performing Arts Center (Cox)
Maintenance Building
McDonald Center
North Commons Building
O.C. Tanner Amphitheater
O.C. Tanner Fountain
O.C. Tanner Fountain Outdoor Stage
Palm Street
Panguitch Education Center
Taylor Health Science Center (Taylor)
Science, Engineering & Technology (SET)
Smith’s Computer Center (Smith)
Snow Math & Science Center (Snow)
Stephen & Marcia Wade Alumni House (Alumni House)
Student Activities Center (SAC)
Technology Building
Tennis Courts
Trailblazer Sports Medicine
Udvar-Hazy Business (Hazy)
University Inn
University Inn House
University Plaza Building A
University Plaza Building B
University Plaza Building C
University Plaza Building D
Water Canyon Center

SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDELINES

Being a social media page manager often takes more time than expected on the onset. Remember that for some people, social media management is a full-time job. It’s important to make enough time to do the job right. These are the tasks you’ll have to be prepared to do if you decide to create or manage a social media page:

Register. In order to represent Utah Tech on social media, you must register your accounts with UMAC.

Begin. You’ll want to form social media goals and strategies. Clear goals make it much easier to make everyday decisions and know if you are on track.

Listen. It’s important to know what others are talking about on social media so that you can join the conversation. There are helpful tools out there for social media monitoring.

Respond. Followers will respond to your social media posts or reach out to you directly and you need to take the time to respond in an appropriate manner, whether that means replying, liking, commenting, direct messaging, or emailing people.Promote: You probably started your social media page to promote your events or your department/college/organization. You’ll have to specify a portion of your content just for thoughtful

Promote. You probably started your social media page to promote your events or your department/college/organization. You’ll have to specify a portion of your content just for thoughtful self promotion.

Participate. Get involved in the conversation, and answer questions in a timely manner.

Curate. Discover and share content from other sites and sources. You’ll need to find many sources to take inspiration/information from, and it takes time to read it all.

Research. Possibly the biggest challenge you’ll have as a social media manager is consistently producing engaging and creative content. You’ll want to look up articles about new types of content, research other accounts for inspiration, and decide when to use those ideas.

Craft. Once you find something to share, you’ll have to figure out how to talk about it and make sure you are staying true to your social media voice and tone.

Post/schedule. All Utah Tech social media accounts need to post 2-3 times consistently year round. You’ll need to continuously post new content on your social media page. Scheduling your posts ahead of time using social media tools can save you some time, but thoughtful scheduling takes time.

Build community. Spend time chatting with other social media managers on campus and find ways to connect your social media page to other UT pages to strengthen our online community.

It can be very helpful to dedicate an intern to social media management but if the plan is to use intern time, then you’ll have to make sure you can keep that intern position in the future.

FILMING ON CAMPUS GUIDE FOR COMMERCIAL PROJECTS

Guidelines for Filming Commercial Projects on the Utah Tech University Campus

All guidelines for filming, which includes photo, motion picture, and video recording, on the Utah Tech University campus must be followed to ensure that UT events and daily activities are conducted without disruption and the right to privacy of all members of the University community is respected. The Filming on Campus Request Form and Filming on Campus Agreement must be submitted prior to filming on campus. All terms and conditions included in the aforementioned documents and in the following guidelines, including payment and insurance requirements, must be followed to film on campus.

 

SCHEDULING

After a Filming on Campus Request Form has been reviewed and accepted, the requestor will be sent a link to reserve a space through Central Scheduling. Filming on campus is contingent on availability of the requested locations. All interior and exterior spaces on campus being used for filming must be reserved. UT will work to meet requests for specific areas and specific times but understand that additional charges to cover custodial and staffing may apply if facilities are used outside of regular business hours. Fees will be assessed and collected through Central Scheduling. Student learning and academic needs take top priority and filming cannot interfere with scheduled academic activities.

 

FEES

Standard fees charged to the community for public use of UT facilities apply when using campus to film.

 

CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE

Before filming can begin, film crews must provide UT with a certificate of insurance as detailed in the Facility Scheduling Request Form provided by Central Scheduling and abide by the terms and conditions included on the form.

 

SCRIPT APPROVAL

Utah Tech University reserves the right to approve the film concept and script.

 

SAFETY & SECURITY

Utah Tech facilities cannot be used in a manner that obstructs or disrupts University operations, interferes with freedom of movement on campus, exposes persons or property to safety hazards or risk injury, or is unlawful. Additionally, film crews may not disengage or disarm any security or fire alarms or otherwise modify or interfere with any of the University’s safety mechanisms. All filming equipment must be set up in a manner that does not create safety hazards, and crews must take steps to ensure that the placement of equipment does not result in tripping hazards, fire hazards, blocked exits, or other safety concerns.

 

PRIVACY

The rights of students, faculty, staff, or campus visitors to permit or decline being filmed or interviewed must be respected at all times. Film crews must obtain necessary consent prior to filming members of the University community.

 

USE OF UT BRANDING

Film crews must secure approval from Utah Tech University Marketing & Communication prior to filming any signage and other items that include Utah Tech University’s name, logo, and branded content.

 

FOOD SERVICES

UT’s Dining Services provides all food and/or beverages served at events on the Utah Tech University campus. Film crews that would like to offer craft services must coordinate with UT Dining.

 

SET DRESSING

Film crews may not drill, nail, glue or alter any campus property in any way without University permission. If permission is granted, crews must return property to its original state.

 

SOUND

Sound associated with filming may not be disruptive to the learning environment. To prevent this, sound should be kept to a minimum if filming occurs next to classrooms while classes are being held or filming should be scheduled when classes are not being held. While Utah Tech will do it best to ensure the filming location is as quiet as possible, there may be unforeseen noises on campus that may not be able to be stopped.

 

DRONE USAGE

If the film crew intends to use a drone, all current standards and guidelines for altitude and zoning must be followed. Additionally, all drone operators must be properly licensed and certified to fly drones commercially, and the use of drones must be cleared with the crew’s production insurance.

 

PERSONNEL

Utah Tech reserves the right to have at least one University employee on location on prep, shoot, and strike days.

 

DAMAGE

Should any property be damaged during production, the film crew will have it repaired or replaced or to pay the University to repair or replace it, as determined solely by the University.

 

RELOCATION

Should any University property or furnishings be moved to facilitate production, the film crew must return items to their original location by the end of the filming period.

 

TECH SCOUT

Tech scouts are allowed and must be arranged with the University’s Marketing & Communication office in advance.

 

PRODUCTION VEHICLES

Parking film crews’ personal and production vehicles on campus must be prearranged, so a temporary parking pass can be issued. Vehicles and equipment associated with filming must be parked in a preapproved location and cannot block designated fire lanes or access to fire protection equipment (e.g. fire hydrants), emergency exit routes, walkways, or handicapped ramps or parking spaces. In areas where vehicle parking will affect pedestrian traffic, film crews will be expected to set up appropriate signage and safety barriers to alert pedestrians to potential hazards. Prior approval must be given if using any heavy machinery.

 

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

The on-campus use, consumption, storage, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of any alcoholic beverage, tobacco product, or controlled substance is not allowed and may not be done by film crews or portrayed by actors being filmed.

FILMING ON CAMPUS GUIDE FOR STUDENT PROJECTS

Guidelines for Filming Student Projects on the Utah Tech University Campus

All guidelines for filming, which includes photo, motion picture, and video recording, on the Utah Tech University campus must be followed to ensure that UT events and daily activities are conducted without disruption and the right to privacy of all members of the University community is respected. The Filming on Campus Request Form and Filming on Campus Agreement must be submitted prior to filming on campus. All terms and conditions included on the aforementioned documents and in the following guidelines must be followed to film on campus.

 

SCHEDULING

After a Filming on Campus Request Form has been reviewed and accepted, the requestor will be sent a link to reserve a space through Central Scheduling. Filming on campus is contingent on availability of the requested locations. All interior and exterior spaces on campus being used for filming must be reserved. UT will work to meet requests for specific areas and specific times. Student learning and academic needs take top priority and filming cannot interfere with scheduled academic activities.

 

SAFETY & SECURITY

Utah Tech facilities cannot be used in a manner that obstructs or disrupts University operations, interferes with freedom of movement on campus, exposes persons or property to safety hazards or risk injury, or is unlawful. Additionally, film crews may not disengage or disarm any security or fire alarms or otherwise modify or interfere with any of the University’s safety mechanisms. All filming equipment must be set up in a manner that does not create safety hazards, and crews must take steps to ensure that the placement of equipment does not result in tripping hazards, fire hazards, blocked exits, or other safety concerns.

 

PRIVACY

The rights of students, faculty, staff, or campus visitors to permit or decline being filmed or interviewed must be respected at all times. Film crews must obtain necessary consent prior to filming members of the University community.

 

USE OF UT BRANDING

Film crews must secure approval from Utah Tech University Marketing & Communication prior to filming any signage and other items that include Utah Tech University’s name, logo, and branded content.

 

SET DRESSING

Film crews may not drill, nail, glue or alter any campus property in any way without University permission. If permission is granted, crews must return property to its original state.

 

SOUND

Sound associated with filming may not be disruptive to the learning environment. To prevent this, sound should be kept to a minimum if filming occurs next to classrooms while classes are being held or filming should be scheduled when classes are not being held. While Utah Tech will do it best to ensure the filming location is as quiet as possible, there may be unforeseen noises on campus that may not be able to be stopped.

 

DRONE USAGE

If the film crew intends to use a drone, all current standards and guidelines for altitude and zoning must be followed. Additionally, all drone operators must be properly licensed and certified to fly drones commercially, and the use of drones must be cleared with the crew’s production insurance.

 

PERSONNEL

Utah Tech reserves the right to have at least one University employee on location on prep, shoot, and strike days.

 

DAMAGE

Should any property be damaged during production, the film crew will have it repaired or replaced or to pay the University to repair or replace it, as determined solely by the University.

 

RELOCATION

Should any University property or furnishings be moved to facilitate production, the film crew must return items to their original location by the end of the filming period.

 

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES

The on-campus use, consumption, storage, possession, manufacture, distribution, or sale of any alcoholic beverage, tobacco product, or controlled substance is not allowed and may not be done by film crews or portrayed by actors being filmed.

UMAC RESOURCES

Contact Information

For additional information, please contact the University Marketing and Communication office at 435-879-4441 or stop by University Plaza – Building C.

To learn more about our team, please visit umac.utahtech.edu/about-us/umac-team/.